Ananda Marga Youth Retreat in Maui Hawaii

UN INT`L DAY OF PEACE

Ulaanbaatar, /MONTSAME/ On September 21st, 2009, Mongolia will be joining countries throughout the world in observing the 27th United Nations International Day of Peace. On this day, the United Nations calls for people around the world to devote a specific time to focusing their efforts on promoting the ideals of peace.
In cooperation with the United Nations, the different religious communities in Mongolia are once again uniting in organizing a day of observance and prayers for peace in their various places of worship, culminating in a programme of prayers from all faiths around the Peace Bell in Sukhbaatar Square at 6.30 p.m. This ceremony will be opened by the Resident Coordinator of the United Nations in Mongolia, Ms Debora Comini, and closed by Mr.Tsedendamba, representing the president of Mongolia's Council of Religious Affairs.

The Five Kinds of Conscience (Viveka)*

The Five Kinds of Conscience (Viveka)*

Viveka (conscience) is a special kind of deliberation. Deliberation (vica'ra) is the endeavour to select a particular idea from several ideas. If a particular person is presented to you as a criminal, then there are two opposing ideas before you: the guilt of the man or his innocence. The process whereby one comes to a conclusion after deliberating upon these two opposing ideas is called vica'ra. When you finally make your decision it is called siddha'nta (conclusion) .

Conscience (viveka) is defined as a special type of vica'ra (deliberation). The denotation of vica'ra is broader than that of viveka. A thief, on entering his victim’s house, considers whether it would be better to start stealing in the dining room or the sitting room. This is a kind of deliberation after which the thief reaches his conclusion. This deliberation is vica'ra and not viveka.

Viveka is that kind of deliberation where there is a conscious endeavour to decide in favour of shreya (benevolence) when confronted with the two opposing ideas of shreya and preya (malevolence) . Viveka is of five types, and their collective name is viveka painÌ­caka.

UTA Yoga Meditation Club Sessions

Yoga is HOT in Finland!

Yoga seems to be becoming a rage in Finland.
Various yoga centers-studios have reportedly popped up in cities across Finland and besides regular yoga classes; retreats, workshops, and even teacher training courses are held in Finland.
The Evangelical Lutheran Church of Finland, which claims over 80 per cent of Finns as its members, states on its website: “Courses in yoga are offered in every part of the country, and it is practiced by tens of thousands. The central organization for yoga practitioners has its own training institute in the countryside, in which yoga leaders are trained and special yoga courses are given…”
In view of its popularity among the Finns, Hindu statesman Rajan Zed has urged the Government of Finland to open a national yoga academy for its preservation, research and promotion, with centers in all major cities of Finland, and also introduce yoga in public schools.

Prout Workshop with Dada Pranesh

August 2009 Newsletter ESPANOL AL FONDO!
Lawrence 305 926-3578

MEDITATION WORKSHOPS Our highest octane class!
STRENGTHEN YOURSELF IN MEDITATION—IT’S THE BEST LIFESAVER IN HARD TIMES—NATURAL, EFFORTLESS, TRANSCENDENTAL, HIGHLY BENEFICIAL.
 
10-12 am, Saturdays, Aug 15 and Sept. 19
North Miami Library, 835 NE 132 St., North Miami 
 
10-12 am, Sundays, Aug. 23    
Charter on the Beach Middle School, 1211 Marseille Drive, Miami Beach

Prout Workshop with Dada Pranesh
Saturday, Aug. 14 9 am - 5 pm
Today as we see exploitive and repressive systems crumbling and elsewhere the horrors of religious fanaticism, it seems clear that the world needs a fresh concept, a new paradigm. “Prout” provides this vision of a socio-economic system based on humanitarian values. Dada Pranesh is in Miami to attend the Haitian Diaspora Unity Conference

Vegetarian Gourmet,Vegetarian Lunch included Donation

Golden Jubilee Celebration of Prout at Madhu Karuna (Germany)

"Ananda Marga Spiritual Conference" – "Golden Jubilee Celebration of Prout" at Madhu Karuna (Germany) from " July 27-Aug 2, 2009 "

What Causes GERD? Effect of Onions and Garlic

Question: What Causes GERD?
Answer: Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD) is caused by reflux of stomach acid into the esophagus. In most sufferers this is due to a relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) that opens to allow food and liquids to pass into the stomach, and closes to prevent food and stomach acid from flowing back into the esophagus. This relaxation of the LES happens a few times each day in people without GERD. It's not known why it happens more frequently in GERD patients. The esophagus lining isn't the same as that of the stomach and isn't able to cope with acid as well as the stomach and is easily injured. It is this reflux of acid into the esophagus that produces the symptoms and potential damages to the esophagus.

Going vegetarian has its benefits

While going meatless isn't for everyone, it can improve your health. Here are tips from nutritionists on making the transition:

Know why you're doing it. Having firm reasons for changing your diet, - moral, ethical, medical, environmental or otherwise - can keep you on track.

Set guidelines. Many vegetarians decide to keep eating eggs and dairy, while others opt to cut all animal products.

Tell family and friends. They may not understand or approve, so be ready to explain your reasons.

Don't go cold turkey. Two strategies are to eliminate one type of meat a week. Try cutting red meat first, say, followed by chicken, pork and seafood. Or swap in one vegetarian meal each week.

Have some recipes ready. Buy a vegetarian cookbook or use an online source such as www.goveg.com. Try one new dish a week to make the switch fun, not a form of deprivation.

Keep eating healthy. Vegetarianism can be very unhealthy if you load up on junk food. Stick with fruits and vegetables, whole grains, beans, nuts, meat substitutes, soy protein and low-fat dairy. Good snacks include fruits and vegetables, almonds, hummus, low-fat granola and whole-grain crackers.

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